The last post (for 2019)

December –the last month of our calendar year.  Short days and long nights.  Holidays include Christmas (honoring birth of Jesus Christ), Kwanzaa (celebrating family, community and culture, primarily in African-American families) and Boxing Day (celebrating the giving of boxes to public and private servants, primarily in the United Kingdom).  For me, December signals a time to reflect on my genealogy goals for the previous 12 months.  How well did I do?

Last January 1, my stated genealogy goals seemed mostly achievable. I did not anticipate any major issues.  My father-in-law’s death on February 17, 2019,  although not totally unexpected, impacted me more than I expected.  My father died in 1998 and my mother in 2007.  My in-laws have been my surrogate parents for the past 12 years. For weeks after his death, I felt mired down. I went through the motions on genealogy projects.  I barely managed to post regularly on my blog. The quality of some posts probably suffered.  Even simple tasks requiring minimal thought, i.e. scanning certificates from a cousin on dad’s side, overwhelmed me.

FYI. My mother-in-law is doing OK. We made it through the summer and winter holidays.  There were tears and happy moments.

Genealogy presented a coping mechanism. Using lessons and skills from the Genealogy Do-Over, I have a well-defined, specific process for reviewing, cataloguing and saving information.  These specific steps help me stay on-target, at least most of the time! Did I occasionally veer off and follow those bright shiny objects that detract from a specific goal?  Oh, yes! But, then, routine took over and I was back on track.sticky note_test

A new project especially helped with grieving. In July 2019, I presented Papa’s sister with copies of the Simmons and Ellerbee scrapbooks. The Simmons scrapbook, presented to Papa in 2013, traced his maternal lineage. The Ellerbee scrapbook, presented to Papa in January 2018, traced his paternal lineage.  I cleaned up source lists and included new information.  The tactile work of cutting and pasting proved therapeutic.

I became more aware of placing ancestors within historical and other perspectives.  For example, I reacted emotionally to the removal of Native Americans from Georgia to make room for my husband’s white ancestors.  I read two books on the topic and one book about the Federal Road between Georgia and Texas. Looking beyond dates and places, I gained a broader view of ancestors’ lives within the context of time periods and places in which they lived.  Consider the impact of local events, such as opening or closing a factory or a major weather storm, on individuals and their community.

I found the “Beyond Kin” project (https://beyondkin.org/ ).  The project helps descendants of slaveholders identify and trace their family’s former slaves. My husband’s paternal and maternal ancestors hail from various Southern states and most were slaveholders.  I downloaded the templates and began by entering slaves held by John E. Ellerbee (1808, Georgia – 1877, Louisiana) in 1850 and 1860.  I haven’t done anything beyond these initial steps. Reports to follow!

Overall, I feel like the fog has  lifted and I am again on semi-solid ground.

Death of my laptop computer caused a major, although temporary, setback. Fortunately, we knew the laptop’s end was near.  I had hoped to have a new computer before the old one’s demise. My computer savvy son built me a new desktop computer. What saved me?  Purchase of notebook computer in 2017 and regular, frequent backups to the Cloud and an external hard drive!

Two maternal cousins found my blog in 2018. We stay in contact. We regularly share information and family heirlooms such as pictures.   An unexpected result and blessing!

I pinned a print copy of 2019 goals to the bulletin board in my office. I tried to review these goals at least once a month. As I completed, added or deferred goals, I wrote the information down. These notes provide quick reminders of progress.

Here are my refined 2019 goals and actions taken during the year:

Tucker-Maurer family (mom’s family):

  1. Continue paper & digital file clean-up. Timeline:  January 2019.  Met- ended major work at end of February 2019.
  2. Defer remainder of work as needed. Some work continued throughout the year, usually to answer a question posed by one of maternal cousins. Goal met.

Ellerbee-Simmons/ Johnson-Reed (husband’s family)

  1. Purchase notebooks for Ellerbee-Simmons & Johnson-Reed certificates, photographs and other memorabilia. DONE.  Purchased dividers for notebooks. Documents placed in appropriate notebook when found  online or in paper files.
  2. Send in husband’s DNA test. NOT DONE.  Purchased kit but did not use.
  3. Continue paper & digital file clean-up for father-in-law’s and/or mother-in-law’s family. Goal MET. More work done on Ellerbee files than Johnson files. 
  4. Plan field trip to Alabama and Georgia to trace Ellerbee family migration. If time and geography permit, follow migration of Johnson-Reed family. DEFERRED – Maybe 2020??

Added in 2019:

  1. Copy Ellerbee and Simmons scrapbooks for father-in-law’s sister. COMPLETED
  2. Resume work on scrapbook for extended family member. Work resumed in Summer 2019. Completed and given as Christmas present.

Posten-Richards family (dad’s family)

  1. Copy paper BMD certificates from Posten relative to digital files. Place originals in Posten BMD notebook. NOT DONE.  Continue in 2020.
  2. Submit at least one article to a local genealogical society for publication in their newsletter.  Priority: Use information from 2010 Posten family history (continued from 2018). NOT DONE. Same goal for  2020 without priority.
  3. Assist nephew to combine family trees of his parents (continued from 2018). Partially  met. Discussed his family tree during visits. Nephew loaned some documents to me. I scanned, copied then returned the documents to him. 
  4. Revise at least 4 chapters of Posten family history book. Explore publication options for  2020.  (One chapter done in 2018). NOT DONE.  Continue in 2020. Contacted by person from a ‘possibly related’ branch.

Genealogy Blog:

  1. Post on regular basis, optimally every 2 weeks. Posted 26 times in 2019.
  2. Post at least 2 stories about each family—Posten-Richards (dad), Tucker-Maurer (mom), Ellerbee-Simmons (father-in-law), Johnson-Reed (mother-in-law). GOAL PARTIALLY MET. Posten-Richards: 0 stories; Tucker-Maurer:  3 stories; Ellerbee-Simmons: 12 stories; Johnson-Reed: 2 stories. Two posts discussed members of all families. Seven posts with no specific family group.
  3. Limit each post to about 1500 words or less. GOAL MET.
  4. Purchase or download software to post GEDCOM family tree. Post at least 2 family trees to blog. NOT MET. Defer to 2020.  
  5. Address Genealogical Proof Standard in reports. PARTIALLY MET. Addressed in 75-90% of posts. In some posts, I discussed one or two criteria. Most of my blog posts are not meant to be the final report on a person or family. In those posts, I acknowledge that the ‘reasonably exhaustive research’ criterion has not been met. However, other criteria are likely to have been met. 

General items:

  1. Create master lists of To-Do/ BSO items and questions for each family. Begin with Tucker-Maurer and Ellerbee families. Partially met. Began using a color-coded file card system.
  2. Send for at least 6 BMD certificates. If budget permits, request one certificate per month. Partially met. Requested death certificates for Anna Klee Maurer, Anna Katharina Korzelius Maurer and Margaret Tucker (mom’s ancestors). Received first two. All from New York and take 6-9 months.
  3. Add to Research Toolbox: books “Dating Vintage Photographs” ; possibly Dragon software.   Not Done. Keep same goal for  2020.
  4.  Continue volunteer genealogy work with Daughters of the American Revolution. GOAL MET.
  5. Enroll in at least one genealogy-related webinar or online class, topic to be determined.  Attended one free webinar on various topics.
  6.  Review Genealogy Proof Standard. Buy book on this topic.   DONE.  Used book as reference. 

BUDGET: 

Budget Spent (Over)/ Under 2020 Proposal
Archival materials $60.00 $279.37 $ (219.37) $200.00
BMD Records $100.00 $59.00 $      41.00 $120.00
Books $75.00 $34.95 $      40.05 $75.00
Copying $10.00 $25.45 $   (15.45) $25.00
Education $150.00 $0.00 $   150.00 $100.00
Ink/ Printing $50.00 $131.68   (81.68) $180.00
Paper $25.00 $55.45   (30.45) $50.00
Subscriptions- annual $50.00 $288.80 $ (238.80) $290.00
Subscriptions-monthly $560.00 $550.80 $        9.20 $560.00
$1,320.00 $1,425.50 $ (361.50) $1600.00

Average cost per month:  about $118.00.

SUMMARY:

Met or partially met 14 of 21 goals set for 2019. Seven goals deferred to 2020. Two additional projects completed in 2019.  Overall, I may have been a bit over-ambitious with goals but am satisfied with progress. Over budget by $361.00.  Added two subscription services, paid annually, in 2019.  Two scrapbook projects were not anticipated when preparing 2019 budget.  Increase budget in these areas for 2020.

Next post:   My personal genealogy goals for 2020

© Susan Posten Ellerbee and Posting Family Roots blog, 2019

Susan’s Genealogy Research Goals for 2019

In my last post,  End of Year Review- 2018 Genealogy Goals,  I reviewed my 2018 goals. Now, I present my 2019 goals and some insights.

Why set goals for your genealogy research?  The terms ‘focus’ and ‘guide’ come to mind.  Focus implies a specific area for your attention. A synonym for guide is ‘direct’ which also means ‘showing the way’.  Goals help you stay focused and direct your path. Annual  genealogy goals should also be flexible.  Circumstances, such as time and money, change.  New opportunities and challenges present themselves.  Be prepared to change or delete.  Be open to adding new goals.

Goals can be broad or narrow.  I believe that broad annual goals serve us better.  Although, some specifics are needed.  Example:   “Order birth/death/ marriage certificates” is probably too broad. “Order at least 4 birth, death or marriage certificates for Tucker-Maurer ancestors”  gives direction and is measurable.

COMMENT:  My teacher persona now kicks in. Most people use the term “goals” in the same way as the term “objectives” .  I view goals as broad statements with a long term focus such as goals for the year, quarter, month or project.  An objective (or step) reflects a short term focus—what do I want to accomplish today, this week, or during this work session.  Objectives are more specific than goals.   “Order death certificate for Anna Klee Maurer from New York in January 2019” is an objective.  Enough of the soapbox. Don’t fret about which term that you use.

I found this blog post helpful:   Setting Genealogy Goals by Jennifer Patterson Dondero. [1]  She suggests five steps:

  1. Previous year review
  2. Broad interest or goal identification
  3. Refining your interests/ goals
  4. Correlating your previous year review with your refinements
  5. Finalizing your resolutions/ goals

I have already reviewed  2018 (see last blog post).  Based on that review, I wrote an initial set of goals (step 4).  So, back to steps 2 and 3.  My broad interest areas are mom’s family (Tucker-Maurer) and husband’s family (specifically Ellerbee). We are tentatively planning a genealogy field trip to Alabama and Georgia in summer 2019. Purpose is to visit areas where Ellerbee family lived during pre-Civil War era.  I reviewed Ellerbee family research in 2014 before we made a trip to east Texas. Ellerbee family review was done December 2017 through January 2018 as I prepared a scrapbook for father- in-law’s 80th birthday.  I think that initial goal refinement is needed to set aside mom’s family for now and focus more on Ellerbee family.  

Here are my refined 2019 goals:

Tucker-Maurer family (mom’s family):

  1. Continue paper & digital file clean-up.  Timeline:  January 2019. 
  2. Defer remainder of work as needed.

Ellerbee-Simmons/ Johnson-Reed (husband’s family)

  1. Purchase notebooks for Ellerbee-Simmons & Johnson-Reed certificates, photographs and other memorabilia.
  2. Send in husband’s DNA test.
  3. Begin paper & digital file clean-up for father-in-law’s and/or mother-in-law’s family.
  4. Plan field trip to Alabama and Georgia to trace Ellerbee family migration. If time and geography permit, follow migration of Johnson-Reed family.

Posten-Richards family (dad’s family)

  1. Copy paper BMD certificates from Posten relative to digital files. Place originals in Posten BMD notebook.
  2. Submit at least one article to a local genealogical society for publication in their newsletter.  Priority: Use information from 2010 Posten family history (continued from 2018). 
  3. Assist nephew to combine family trees of his parents (continued from 2018).
  4. Revise at least 4 chapters of Posten family history book. Explore publication options for  2020.  (One chapter done in 2018).

Genealogy Blog:

  1. Post on regular basis, optimally every 2 weeks.
  2. Post at least 2 stories about each family- Posten-Richards (Dad), Tucker-Maurer (Mom), Ellerbee-Simmons (Father-in-law), Johnson-Reed (Mother-in-law).
  3. Limit each post to about 1500 words.
  4. Purchase or download software to post GEDCOM family tree. Add at least 2 family trees to blog.
  5. Address Genealogical Proof Standard in reports/ posts.

General items:

  1. Create master lists of To-Do/ BSO items and questions for each family. Begin with  Tucker-Maurer and Ellerbee families.
  2. Send for at least 6 BMD certificates. If budget permits, request one certificate per month.
  3. Add to Research Toolbox: Book about “Dating Vintage Photographs”; possibly Dragon software.
  4. Continue volunteer genealogy work with Daughters of the American Revolution.
  5. Enroll in at least one genealogy-related webinar or online class, topic to be determined.  
  6. Review Genealogy Proof Standard. Buy book on this topic.  https://www.genealogyexplained.com/basics/genealogica

Budget:

Printer & ink             $  60.00
Paper/ Notebooks $ 10.00
Books $ 50.00
BMD Certificates $ 120.00
Personal education $ 150.00
Subscriptions $ 600.00
TOTAL $1040.00   

Want more information about research goals? Look at these websites:  

Thomas MacAntee, Genealogy Do-Over, Month 2:  https://abundantgenealogy.com/genealogy-month-2-february-2018/  

Legacy Tree Genealogists:  https://www.legacytree.com/blog/setting-smart-genealogy-research-goals

Family Tree Magazine:  https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/family-tree-university/genealogy-goal-setting/

REFLECTION:

I have learned so much in the past two years from the Genealogy Do-Over. My file clean-up efforts will eventually pay off although progress sometimes seems very slow. My research habits continue to improve. My family feels a little neglected at times. I need to balance my genealogy and family time better.  

My husband suggested that I can earn money with genealogy. To do that, I need to pursue certification. I am not adding that to my goals for 2019 but will keep it in mind.

What I learned:  Define broad interest/ research areas.  Some of my blog posts meet the ‘reasonably exhaustive research’ standard and some do not. I use the blog as a sounding board for questions and brick walls.  The work doesn’t have to be complete for posting here.

What helped: Finding blog post about Setting Research Goals from The Occasional Genealogist. I reformatted my initial scattered list into broad interest areas/ categories. I believe this organization will help me to focus in 2019.

What didn’t help:  My background as a teacher wanting to separate goals and objectives. Not everyone needs to make that distinction! It’s a matter of semantics.

To-Do:  See my 2019 goals.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!


[1] Jennifer Patterson Dondero, “Setting Genealogy Goals”, The Occasional Genealogist, December 2017 (https://www.theoccasionalgenealogist.com/2017/12/genealogy-goals-new-year.html   : accessed 20 December 2018).

End of Year Review–2018 Genealogy Goals

December, a time to remember our blessings through the giving of gifts and family celebrations. One of my gifts has been time for Genealogy Do-Over.  How did I spend that gift?  In this post, I reflect on the year and present my 2018 goals and activities.

Overall, I am pleased with my genealogical research this year.  Contact with 4 cousins includes sharing information and asking for opinions about questionable data or conclusions drawn by others.  I was pleasantly surprised when one cousin sent me a box of old family pictures. Another cousin shared pictures digitally. My mother’s album of similar pictures has been lost so this was a wonderful gift!

I routinely use Genealogy Do-Over principles as new research directions appear.  I talked to my oldest son about preserving the legacy.  Daily computer time was limited for several weeks due to a painful shoulder.  Shoulder problem is now resolved as long as I work in short bursts.  Maybe Santa Claus will bring Dragon software? 

I hoped to complete digital clean-up of Mom’s family tree by the end of the year.  Did progress on Genealogy Do-Over interfere with conducting new research and following new leads?  In some ways, yes.  However, I did follow new leads.  Developing more efficient research habits meant slowing down a little. Specifically, I renamed digital documents immediately after downloading to my computer and  before saving the document to genealogy software.  I cited the source right then, too. This practice will ultimately save time later. Thorough documentation helped me to find insights that I would probably have missed before.  And, I wrote down those insights including  how I came to a specific conclusion!   

Writing blog posts took more time than I expected each week.  Some posts are really long and potentiallydifficult to follow.  At the end of theyear, I set a goal of 1500 words or less for each post. This goal will continuefor 2019. As I wrote, I gained new perspectives about each person or family. Gaps and questions seemed more clear.   

Susan’s Genealogy 2018 Goals:

  1. Continue paper and digital file clean-up.  Focus on mom’s family as Dad’s family files are almost done. Results:  Goal met.  Work continues on mom’s tree. 
    • Created research logs for 80 of the 297 persons in mom’s tree, including 28 identified direct line ancestors. The non-direct line persons (N = 52) are siblings of direct line ancestors and the siblings’  spouses.
    • Completed paper records (Individual worksheet, Research checklist, Biographical outline) for direct line ancestors and their siblings.
    • Digitally, renamed media files and rewrote source citations using Roots Magic source templates/ Evidence Explained[1] format.  Approximately 75% complete for Mom’s tree.
    • Refined labelling system for digital files.
    • Used same process of paper and digital file cleanup for a few files in other family trees (Dad, Father-in-law,Mother-in-law).
  2. Submit at least one article to a local genealogical society for publication in their newsletter. Use information from 2010 Posten family history.
    • Result:  Not met. Presented information to local DAR chapter about Father-in-law’sdistant cousin who lived in Oklahoma before statehood.  Keep same goal for 2019.
  3. Revise at least 4 chapters of Posten family history book. Explore publication optionswith expected publication in 2019.
    • Results:  Partially met. Revised one chapter of Posten family history book. Continue same goal for 2019.
  4. Send copies of grandparents’ BMD certificates to cousin.
    • Results: Met. Sent copies of grandparents’ certificates plus other BMD certificates to cousin. Sent print-ready copies of blog posts to another cousin.
  5. Send for at least 6 BMD certificates. If budget permits, request one certificate per month.
    • Results:  Partially met. Requested 5 certificates. One certificate sent to me by another Tucker-Maurer family researcher. Received 2 of 4 certificates requested. Waiting for 2 certificates from New York.  Certificates from State of New York can take 8-9 months. Certificates from New York City usually received within 6-8 weeks.
  6. Blog-related goals:
    • Post on more regular basis, optimally every 2 weeks.  Goal met.
    • Expand to husband’s family, at least 4 stories about his family during the year. Goal met.  Posted 5 stories about husband’s family.
      • Simmons,Ellerbee, Johnson-Reed scrapbooks—posted 29 January 2018
      • Valentine in the family tree: Valentine Creager—posted 14 February 2018
      • Elegy to Elizabeth Hayes Ellerbee – posted 5 March 2018
      • Pre-1850 census records using William Bailey as example – posted 25 September 2018
      • Holcomb family and New Madrid Earthquakes, 1811-1812, posted December 3, 2018.
    • Explore options for posting family trees to blog. Goal partially met.  Option called RootsPersona ( https://rootspersona.com/) is one option. For 2019, post at least two family trees to blog.
  7. Learn more about DNA testing.  Join DNA Do-over Facebook group. Goal met. Joined Facebook group on 4 January 2018. Read posts about once a week.
  8. Post DNA results to GEDmatch.  Goal met. Posted DNA results to GEDmatch on January 7, 2018. Posted family tree to GEDmatch in March 2018.  Helped one DNA match discover biologic grandmother (person and person’s mother had been adopted; person was able to give me possible surnames and a location).
  9. Assist nephew to combine family trees of his parents (his mother is my sister). Goal not met. Talked about family trees during visits to nephew.
  10. Prepare Ellerbee family scrapbook for Papa (Father-in-law). Goal met. Completed 11 January 2018. Presented to him in honor of 80th birthday.

Other activities:

  • Created digital scrapbook of vintage Tucker-Maurer photographs. Includes photos sent to me by two cousins.
  • Consulted books and online resources about preservation of vintage photographs.
  • Purchased archival quality plastic sleeves for preservation of vintage Tucker-Maurer photographs.
  • Purchased notebooks for BMD certificates, photographs and other memorabilia of Posten-Richards and Tucker-Maurer families.
  • Used principles learned in Genealogy Do-Over to research families of two persons who are related to me by marriage.
  • Joined GenealogyBank for access to newspapers.
  • Continued routine scheduled backups to Cloud and external hard drive.
  • Purchased 7 books for Research Toolbox: 
    • Berry, Kenyatta D. The Family Tree Toolkit. New York, New York: Skyhorse Publishing, 2018.
    • Bettinger, Blaine T. Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy. Kindle edition.Cincinnati, Ohio: Family Tree Books, No date.
    • Crawford,Mark.  Confederate Courage on Other Fields: Overlooked Episodes of Leadership,Cruelty, Character, and Kindness. El Dorado Hills, California:  Savas Beatie, 2017.
    • Hendrickson, Nancy. 52 Weeks of Genealogy: Projects for Every Week of the Year. Kindle edition. San Diego, California: Green Pony Press, 2017.
    • Lardas,Mark. Nashville 1864: From the Tennessee to the Cumberland.  New York: Osprey Publishing, 2017.
    • Richards, Amber. Preserve Your Family Pictures: How to Save Photo Heirlooms for Future Generations. Kindle edition. Publication information not listed.
    • Rigdon,John C. Historical Sketch and Roster of the Georgia 25th Infantry Regiment. Kindle edition.Cartersville, Georgia: Easter Digital Resources, 2015.

How much did my hobby cost?  Here’s the breakdown:

  • Archival materials      $ 76.83 (includes scrapbook items)
  • BMD records                $92.00
  • Books                            $74.80
  • Copying                       $    4.20 (forms for paper files)
  • Ink/ printer                  $339.95(New printer July 2018)
  • Online databases        $788.75 (Discontinued 1 due to minimal results)
  • Paper/Scrapbook        $  10.00 (3 reams paperfrom estate sale)

Total                           $1386. 53

Average/ month        $  115.54

Ink/ printer and online database costs should decrease in 2019.  

Next blog post:  2019 goals and budget   


SOURCES

[1] ElizabethShown Mills. Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3rd ed. (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2015).

Great-Grandfather Daniel S. Posten and the 1900 census

Question:  Where did  great-grandfather Daniel S. Posten live in 1900?

This blog post outlines one experience in my Genealogy Do-Over journey.   “Tracking Research” and “Conducting Research” are the topics for Month 4 (April 2017).  OK,  so I’m still behind on some of my lessons.  And, I am still working on improving my research practices.  I want to share one example of how the system worked for me.

Here is a copy of my original family group sheet (FGS) for paternal great-grandfather Daniel S. Posten.

Posten_Daniel _S_FGS_ca 1988026

The yellowish color of the paper and the form itself suggest that this is one of my earliest attempts, probably started about  1987.  Entries are written in pen and pencil and may have been made at different times. This was definitely a work-in-progress!   For the Genealogy Do-Over, I used a different form and re-wrote the FGS.  I have confirmed a lot of information so the entries are neater and more complete. I started entering trees online in 2001 and Dad’s tree would have been one of the first.

gg62755812Write your name (as preparer) and date on each form.  Many forms have space for this information.  In general,  use a pen to write information that you can confirm.  Use pencil, different color ink, or highlighter for  information that needs to be confirmed. 

A research log is the way to track research efforts.  I am beginning to see the log as a diary of sorts about the journey.  As I filled out the log and other documentation forms for Daniel, I found several gaps.  Daniel was born in 1859 and died in 1918.  I downloaded a copy of his death certificate in 2010 and received an original copy (dated 1979) from a cousin in 2012.  That original copy has been scanned and placed in acid-free, archival quality sleeve in Posten binder.

One way to track our ancestors is through the United States federal census, conducted every 10 years since 1790.  Census records are available through 1940.  States also conducted censuses at random times.  A list of state censuses can be found here:  https://www.census.gov/history/www/genealogy/other_resources/state_censuses.html

From previous searches, I tracked Daniel in 1860[1], 1880[2], and 1910[3].  After his death, Lizzie (Elizabeth Phoebe Fulkerson), his wife, was listed with my grandparents in 1920[4] and with another daughter, Bertha Posten Brack, in 1930.[5] Lizzie died in 1938.  All of this information was entered on the newly created research log in May 2017.  I hadn’t really noticed the gap until I filled out the research log for Daniel.  Yes, this gap should also be apparent from the genealogy software program listing of events for Daniel.  There is a note for 1870 with Daniel’s parents:  “Family moved to Pittston about 1870; date from obituaries for both James and his wife, Meriam.”  Since Daniel would have been with his parents in 1870, I decided to conduct that search later.

Where were Daniel and Lizzie in 1900?  Have I searched before and not found anything?  If so, what and where did I search?  With no research log, the answer is:  “I don’t know.” Action item for To-Do List:  “Locate 1900 census record for Daniel S. Posten.    Target Resources:  Ancestry, FamilySearch, census books at OK History Center. Start West Pittston.”  Why start in West Pittston?  Because that’s where the family lived in 1910.

And, here’s the rest of the story.  Date:  July 11, 2017:   In depth review of records for great-grandparents, Daniel S. Posten and Elizabeth Phoebe Fulkerson.  Research goal for day:  Locate 1900 census record.  Start with West Pittston, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania.  Go to Ancestry website.  West Pittston has 3 districts, with about 50 pages of census records for each.  Big Sigh!!  District #1 – no luck.   Stretch, get water and a snack.

Look at family group sheet again.   Three of their 8 children were born around 1900:  Bertha in 1895, Martha Jane in 1898, and Samuel in 1901.  Birthplace for those 3 children is listed as Ransom Township, Lackawanna county, Pennsylvania.  Check sources – obituaries and death certificates for Bertha, Martha and Samuel.  Maybe I was looking in the wrong place!  Go to census record for Ransom Township.  Only 22 pages!   And, success!  On Page 3B,  Danial S. Poster (as transcribed), wife Lizzie, and  6 children. [6]

Research goal met!    Additional information from 1900 census—Lizzie is recorded as mother of 6 children with 6 children living.  On 1910 census, she is recorded as mother of 8 children with 7 living.  The two census records combined support a fact recorded by others, with no documentation, that another child,  Ida, was born about 1903 and died  about 1908.  I am still searching for Ida.

reflection-swirl-green-color-hi

REFLECTION:  Using the research log, I identified that I didn’t know where Daniel and his family lived in 1900.  I initially used only one clue, residence in West Pittston in 1910, to find them.  I only searched one website because that is the one that I am most comfortable with.  I met research goal for this session and didn’t follow any BSOs .  I downloaded census record immediately and recorded information on research log and genealogy software.  Total time spent:  about 45 minutes.  If I had looked at FGS closer before beginning, I might have noticed reported birthplace of children as Ransom Township and avoided searching 50 pages of West Pittston census.   Transcription of surname as “Poster” may have been an issue.  Since I hadn’t filled out a research log before May, 2017, it is possible that I had previously looked in West Pittston and Pittston, found nothing, then became discouraged and stopped searching.  Suggestion for future:  Review all documents to narrow search criteria. Recognize that notes on research log may have been written at end of a long day and may or may not reflect the best search criteria.  Continue creation of research logs for direct ancestors in Posten line.  Vary websites and other sources so I can become more familiar with each.

Participating in the Genealogy Do-over is helpful although frustrating at times.   Slowing down to complete specific tasks is still a challenge.  I am now working on Dad’s great-grandparents. Citations are getting easier.  When I print an item, I often add more information about the source than what is printed.   In the last month, I started 2 new projects, using improved techniques and tools.  TO DO:  midyear review.  Read Genealogy Do-Over, Months 4-6 again!

[1] 1860 U.S. census,  Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Price Twp., p. 76 (penned),  dwelling 516, family 691, Daniel S. Posten : digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 1142.

[2] 1880 U.S. census, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania population schedule, Pittston, Enumeration District [ED] 136, p. 18B (penned), dwelling 163, family 177, Daniel Bostons [Posten]: digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 1150, image 0464.

[3] 1910 U.S. census, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania population schedule, West Pittston, Enumeration District [ED] 127, p. 17B (penned), family 405, Daniel S. Paster [Posten]: digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, roll 1370, image 528.

[4] 1920 U.S. Census, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, pop.sch., Ransom Twp., enumeration district (ED) 93, p. 6B, Family #118, Elizabeth Posten; digital images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed, viewed, downloaded 13 December 2016);  citing National Archives and Records Administration. Roll T625_1578.

[5] 1930 U.S. Federal Census, Lackawanna county, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Scranton, enumeration district (ED) 26, p. 2B (penned), Elizabeth Posten mother-in-law, 69; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed, viewed, printed 13 Dec 2016); citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Washington, D. C.. Microfilm publication T626, Roll 2052, Image 187.0.

[6] 1900 U.S. census, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania population schedule, Ransom Twp, Enumeration District [ED] 40, p. 3B (penned), dwelling 42, family 43, Danial S. Poster [Daniel S. Posten]: digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 Jul 2017); from National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1419.

Genealogy Do-Over: Month 1

This post is a summary of my plans and accomplishments for Month 1 of  my Genealogy Do-Over.  First question is:  how did I find out about the Genealogy Do-over?  As I remember (it has been 4 months now),  I knew that I needed to re-organize my genealogy files.  But, I wasn’t sure how or where to start.  The job seemed overwhelming with multiple family lines.  When I converted from Family Tree Maker to RootsMagic™ in January, 2016, I joined the RootsMagic facebook group.  Someone in that group mentioned the Do-Over and I went looking.  At last, structure and directions!

Focus for Month 1 is ‘Setting research aside’ and ‘preparing to research’ (Source: Thomas MacAntee, The Genealogy Do-over returns for 2017 ( http://www.geneabloggers.com/genealogy-month-1-january-2017 : accessed 2 Jan 2017).  You mean that I won’t actually be doing any genealogy research for awhile?  OK,  I’m in!   Goals:  organize files (digital & paper), review documents, list current research habits.

DISCLAIMER:  I adapted ideas from others.

Goal #1:  Organize files.

  1. Move scattered media files for each family tree to one location on computer.  Results:  Completed 16 Jan 2017.  Created a media folder for each family tree.  Moved media from various locations to respective media folders.   New research habit: place media item in appropriate media folder as soon as item is copied or downloaded.  Decide rule for naming  media items. Follow rule.
  2.  Color code paper files.  Results:   Purchased colored file folders in January, 2017.  Assigned color to each family tree (father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in-IMG_0335law, nephew, brother-in-law).  Filing system:  direct line ancestors in colored folders; siblings, children, cousins, other non-direct line persons in manila folders with appropriately colored dots.   Completed conversion of  files for parents & parents-in-laws to new system as of today (13 April 2017).
  3.  Consistent paper trail for each family/ person.  So many choices!  I have multiple samples of family group sheets, research logs, tracking sheets, migration/ biography sheets.  Executive decision to use these forms:
    1.  5- generation pedigree.  Created from home person (father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in law) for each tree from RootsMagic.  Circled specific generation in the paper file and placed this as first page in each file.   Reason rapid identification of where this particular family fits.   Pedigree file example010
    2. Family Group Sheet: National Archives & Records Administration (NARA).  2- page (or front and back) form with space for 15 children.  Limitation:  No designated space to add compiler & date compiled.  I add this information at the bottom of the sheet.
    3.  Individual worksheet: Midwest Genealogy Center, Mid-Continent Public Library System, Missouri.  Fillable PDF.
    4. Research checklist:   Midwest Genealogy Center,Mid-Continent Public Library System, Missouri . Fillable PDF.
    5. Biographical outline:  Excerpted from The Unpuzzling Your Past Workbook, copyright 1996 by Emily Anne Croom.  Used with permission of Betterway Books, a division of F&W publications, Cincinnati, Ohio.  Check your local library for a copy of this book

Goal #2:  Review documents.  Ongoing; subject for a later post.

Goal #3:  List current research habits that need repair:

  • Following leads wherever the search takes me.   Remedy:   Set specific objective for each session.  Stop when objective met.  Repeat as needed and as time permits.
  • Following rabbit trails (aka “bright shining objects” — Thanks, Thomas MacAntee for that insight!).  Remedy:  STOP.  Go to Remedy #1.
  • Inconsistent citations/ documentation of sourcesRemedy: Use RootsMagic source citation templates. (Note: deferred for now).  Buy Evidence Explained book (done); consult EE website as needed.     Document sources immediately.
  • Relying too much on online family trees.  Also, not  transferring data/ documents to RootsMagic trees. Remedy:  Use other resources.  Transfer data/ documents as soon as possible after review, ideally before ending session.
  • Rare use of research logs.  Remedy:    Locate or design research log format.   Test use of research log.  Outcome:  Decided to use research log created by Thomas MacAntee.  Test case:  subject for another post.

Enough for today! Enjoy your weekend!