School teacher, soldier, farmer-James T.L. Powell

Every soldier has a story before they became a soldier. In genealogical research, I sometimes identify people only in terms of their military experience. But, there is more to each person’s story. Previously, I wrote about a Confederate soldier, James T. L. Powell. This post describes James in terms of his other roles — son, husband, father and school teacher and farmer.

Little Creek School house, circa 1870, Buchanan, posted July 11, 2017.  Courtesy Brian Brown/Vanishing North Georgia

Profile: James T.L. Powell & Deborah Daniel (1st wife)

For more information about education in the 1860s:

 “Education during the 1860s,” American Battlefield Trust, no date ( https://www.battlefields.org/learn/articles/education-during-1860s   :   accessed 5 November  2019).

Elyse Hoganson,  “The evolution of  schools in Bartow County, Georgia,”  Etowah Valley Historical Society,  no date  (https://evhsonline.org/archives/43743   : accessed 5 November2019).

Brian Tomlin. “Schooling of the 1860s”,  Civil War Blog,  a project of PA Historian,  26 March 2012 (https://civilwar.gratzpa.org/2012/03/schooling-of-the-1860s/   :  accessed 5 November 2019).

Reflection:

I rewrote this post more often than usual. I just wasn’t happy with my standard recitation of facts and questions. I googled ‘writer’s block’ and found a website, “Warts and All” (https://wartsandall.blog/2019/06/25/writers-block/ ) with some ideas and templates. I tried one of the templates and liked the relative clean look. The result is this post.  

I still have lots of questions about James and Deborah. I didn’t meet the ‘reasonably exhaustive’ research criterion.   I checked Family Search again for new documents – no results. I checked Internet Archive for books about the histories of Calhoun county, Georgia and Cherokee county, Texas.  I found one book about each with no results for relevant persons with surnames of Powell or Daniel.  Print books are available at libraries distant from me. I searched Louisiana newspapers (Newspapers.com) with mixed results, specifically obituaries for Alvey and some of James’ grandchildren. Research about these descendants is not complete.

Unexpected result:  Grandparents of Cora Dowdle  (wife of Alvey Powell) are Stephen Myers Hester and Mary Delphine Fayard. Stephen and Mary are also grandparents of Deedie Bailey Simmons, my husband’s great-grandmother. My husband shares more DNA with Alvey and Cora’s descendants than we thought!

What I learned/ recalled:  Value of using multiple sources. Obituaries often give married names of female siblings and daughters.  More than one way to present information.

What helped:  Previous research about James and Deborah virtually complete with research logs and sources.

What didn’t help:  Stopping to follow-up on James and Deborah’s descendants. Finally realized that I didn’t need to include all information about all descendants for this post. I still can’t confirm Deborah’s death date or place! 

To-DO:  Obtain death certificate copies for Alonzo Powell (died 1940, Louisiana); James M Powell (died 1948, Louisiana) and Peter Powell (died 1955, Louisiana). Add to BSO list – create research logs for Alonzo, James & Peter; learn more about their children. Questions:  Who moved to Louisiana first? What was reason for moving from Texas to Louisiana?  Follow Miles & Mahala Buzby as clue to James’ parentage. Mahala could be related to James. Discover information about Thomas and Eleanor Daniel, presumed parents of Deborah A.C. Daniel.  

Sources for James T.L. Powell, School Teacher

Sumter County, Georgia, Marriage Books, Sumter County Ordinary Court, 1850-1857, p.218, no. 24, James T.L. Powell, Deborah A.C. Daniel, 28 June 1857; digital images, University System of Georgia, Georgia Archives (http://vault.georgiaarchives.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/countyfilm/id/289112/rec/3      : accessed,downloaded, printed 24 March 2017); Georgia Archives, Morrow, Georgia.

1860 U.S. Census, Calhoun county, Georgia, pop. sch., 3rd Distric, p. 139 (stamped), dwelling 335, family 335, James T.L. Powell age 25; digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com   : accessed, downloaded & printed 8 November 2017); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication M653_113.

National Archives & Records Administration, “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Georgia,” digital images, Fold3 (https://www.fold3.com   : accessed, printed, downloaded 8 October 2018), entry for Powell, James T.L., 18 pages; citing NARA M266. “Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Georgia units, labeled with each soldier’s name, rank, and unit, with links to revealing documents about each soldier.” Roll 0366.

1870 U.S. Census, Calhoun County, Georgia, population schedule, Militia District 626, p. 55 (ink pen, p. 585 (stamp), dwelling 510, family 486, Jas T L Powell; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com   : accessed, downloaded. printed 9 November 2017); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication M593_138.

“Texas Marriage Collection, 1814-1909 and 1966-2002,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com   : accessed 1 November 2019), entry for J.T.L. Powell and Catherine Brown, 19 April 1877, Cherokee county; citing county courthouse records  extracted from copies of original records in microfilm, microfiche, or book format.

1880 U.S. Census, Cherokee county, Texas, population schedule, Precinct no. 8, enumeration district (ED) 19, p. 1 (ink pen); p. 447A (stamp), dwelling 6, family 6, D.C. Powel age 9/12; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com   : viewed, downloaded, printed 26 December 2015); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C., microfilm publication T9, roll 1295.

© Susan Posten Ellerbee and Posting Family Roots blog, 2019

Moving south: Migration of John E. Ellerbee (1808-1884)

Moving south. Those two words summarize the migration pattern of my husband’s ancestor, John E. Ellerbee. John’s story begins at his birth near Georgia’s eastern border with South Carolina.  His story ends on Florida’s western coast.  My last post told about John’s two marriages. This post describes the facts of John’s migration pattern based on census and marriage records.

SOURCE:  “Research our records- Military records-Civil War-Pictures of the Civil War,” digital images, The National Archives ( https://www.archives.gov/files/research/military/civil-war/photos/images/civil-war-013.jpgaccessed 25  August 2019), photo no. 200-CC-306, “A refugee family leaving a war area with belongings loaded on a cart, ”  NARA identifier  559267; citing Library of Congress Collection, ca 1905-ca 1909, Series: Stereographs of the Civil War, 1861-1865.


To refresh your memory, I found John, Martha, and 8 children, ages ranging from 2 to 19 years,  in Baker county, Georgia in 1850.[1]  Baker county is in the southwestern corner of Georgia.  Earlier censuses, specifically 1830 [2] and 1840[3],  show John Ellerbee in Houston County, Georgia.  

The 1850 census taker recorded both county and state of birth. Many census takers recorded only the state as birthplace. These unexpected details provided a way to easily trace the family’s migration. Here are the census data with my comments in italics:

  • John Ellerbee, age 42, farmer born Burke county, Georgia about 1808. Presumed head of household.  
  • Martha Ellerbee, age 25. Born North Carolina about 1825. Confirmed as wife by 1842 marriage record for John Elibee and Martha Love in Randolph county, Georgia [4].
  • Edward Ellerbee, age 19, farmer.  Born about 1831, Houston county, Georgia. Presumed son of John Ellerbee and his 1st wife.
  • Elizabeth Ellerbee, age 14. Born about 1836, Houston county, Georgia, Presumed daughter of John Ellerbee and his 1st wife. Same birthplace as Edward suggests that she is Edward’s sister.
  • James Ellerbee, age 12. Born about 1838,  Houston county, Georgia. Presumed son of John Ellerbee and his 1st wife. Same birthplace as Edward and Elizabeth suggests a sibling relationship.
  • Presumed children of John Ellerbee and Martha:
    • Sanderlin Ellerbee, age 6. Born about 1844 in Randolph county, Georgia.
    • Smith Ellerbee, age 5.  Born about 1845 in Randolph county, Georgia.
    • Jasper Ellerbee, age 4.  Born about 1846 in Baker county, Georgia
    • child not named, age 3. Born about 1847 in Baker county, Georgia.
    • Martha Ellerbee, age 2. Born about 1848) in Baker county, Georgia.
    • Ages of the youngest five children suggest birth intervals of 12 months to 2 years which is consistent with spacing during this time period.
  • James Parker, age 15. Born about 1835 in Washington county, Georgia. Possibly not related.

The 1860 census taker found the family in Calhoun county, Georgia.  [5]  Calhoun county was formed in 1854 from northern sections of Early and Baker counties. [6]  The family possibly  lived in the same place from 1850 to 1860.  By 1860, the family expanded to 11 children:   Sandlin, 16; Smith R, 15; Jasper, 13; Damarius, 11; Martha, 10; Candis, 7; Eliza, 6;  Marion, 4; O.Suphena and I.Suphena (twins), 2; “babe”, age 2 months.

By 1870, John had again moved south. John, his wife and 10 children lived in Jackson county, Florida. [7]  Their youngest child, SmithiAnn, was born about 1863 in Georgia. Sandlin married in Jackson county in 1866. [8]  These dates suggest a move between 1863 and 1866. James John Ellerbee, youngest son of John and his first wife, remained in Georgia, where James later died. [9]  During 1872, two daughters, Candis and Martha, married in Jackson county. [10], [11]

Northern Florida still seemed too far north for John. So, he moved his family to Hillsborough county, Florida. [12] His son, Jasper, married in Hillsborough county in 1874[13] so the move probably occurred about 1873.  Hillsborough county is near the middle of Florida on the western coast. You may recognize Tampa, Jackson county seat. John died in Hillsborough county, Florida, in 1884. [14]

After John’s death, Martha Love Ellerbee moved in with her daughter, Eliza Ann Carter, and family. The 1885 census [15] in Hillsborough county, Florida, is the last record found for Martha.

MAP SOURCE: Bonner, W. G. (1851) Bonner’s pocket map of the state of Georgia. [Milledgeville, Ga.: Wm. G. Bonner] [Map] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/99462703/.      Retrieved 31 July 2019. County names and dates for John Ellerbee’s migration added by Susan Posten Ellerbee.

Combining information from census and marriage records yields this migration timeline: 

  • 1808:  John Ellerbee born Burke county, Georgia
  • 1st marriage, about 1830, possibly Houston county, Georgia; distance about 150 miles.
  • Circa 1831 – 1840:  Houston county, Georgia
    • Edward, Elizabeth and James born in Houston county; estimated birth years 1831, 1836, 1838, respectively
  • Circa 1840 – 1842: Death of 1st wife. Location: unknown; either Houston or Randolph counties
  • 1842:  Randolph county, Georgia (marriage to Martha Love). Distance: about 100 miles.
  • Circa 1844: Randolph county, Georgia
  • Circa 1846-1850: Baker county, Georgia. Distance: about 20 miles
  • 1860: Calhoun county, Georgia (possibly same place as 1850 since Calhoun county was formed in 1854 from parts of Early and Baker counties)
  • Circa 1865:  Jackson county, Florida. Distance: about 75 miles
  • About 1873:  Hillsborough county, Florida. Distance: about 340 miles
  • 1884:  John Ellerbee dies in Hillsborough county, Florida
  • After 1885:  Martha Love Ellerbee dies, probably in Hillsborough county, Florida.

Taking only hours today, these moves would have taken days or even weeks. The last move of over 300 miles must have been especially grueling for John, in his late 60s, and Martha, in her mid to late 40s. John and Martha moved at least 4 times during their 40+ years of marriages. At least 9 of their 12 of their children remained in Florida.   

Why did John move south?  Much of southwestern Georgia originally belonged to the Creek Indians. [16]  The opening of Indian land for settlement is a likely reason for John’s moves. This discovery adds an historical perspective to John’s story.  I need to explore this further.  

Why did John choose to move south rather than west? Some of my husband’s ancestors trekked to Texas after the Civil War. Other white Southern families moved to Mexico and South America after the Civil War. Many black families moved to Northern cities and towns. (See “For more information” at end of post).   Although John did not serve in the Confederacy, at least three of his sons (Edward, James John and Sandlin) did. The Ellerbee book presents one clue: “According to family tradition, he converted his life savings into Confederate money during the Civil War. One of his younger sons kept the trunkful of worthless money for many years.”[17]  Were there too many memories and hardships in Georgia?  What was offered in Florida that enticed him to move? Did he just want to start over in a new place? And, again, why south?

For more information:

Shari Eli, Laura Salisbury, Allison Shertzer. “Migration responses to Conflict: Evidence from the Border of the American Civil War,” Working paper 22591, National Bureau of Economic Research, (http://eh.net/eha/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/EliSalisburyShertzer.pdf  : accessed 25 August 2019).

Kendra Taira Field, Growing up with the country: Family, race and nation after the Civil War. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 2018.

Katie Vernon, “The Mass Exodus of  Confederates to Brazil after the Civil War,”  The Vintage News,  13 August 2018 (https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/08/13/confederates-brazil/ :    accessed 25 August  2019).

Todd W. Wahlstrom, The Southern Exodus to Mexico: Migration across the Borderlands after the American Civil War. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 2015.

Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The epic story of America’s Great Migration. New York, NY: Random House, 2010.

Reflection:

This post began as part of last week’s post about John’s wives. I realized that the post was just getting too long and had 2 different topics. Separating the topics helped me focus.

What I learned:  My husband’s family migrated to Texas after the Civil War. I accepted their movement West as a well-known fact. I did not realize that other Confederate families went to Mexico and South America until I searched for additional sources for this post. I remember hearing briefly in history class about the Great Migration of Black families to the North. The impact of those decisions did not directly affect me or my family but I want to learn more. John Ellerbee occupied land that originally belonged to the Creek Indians.

What helped:  Digital and paper file clean-up almost complete for John & Martha. Scrapbook done last year for father-in-law. Online interactive county formation maps.

What didn’t help:  Finding, then losing, digital 1850 Georgia map. Laptop death at end of July.  

To-do:  Continue research on John & Martha’s children. Prepare research logs for each child. Locate death date and location for Martha Love Ellerbee focusing on Hillsborough county, Florida.  Locate and read Isabel Wilkerson’s book. Locate information about Indians in southwestern Georgia and the loss of their lands.

SOURCES:

[1] 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Baker County, Georgia, population schedule, District 3, p. 49 B (penned), dwelling 1111, family 141, John E. Ellerbee; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com  : accessed, printed, downloaded 3 January 2018); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. Roll M432_61.

[2] 1830 U.S. Census, Houston County, Georgia, population schedule, page 291, John  Ellerbee; digital images, US Gen Web (http://files.usgwarchives.net/ga/houston/census/1830/pg1.txt   : viewed, downloaded, printed 6 February 2016); page 291, line 14, John Ellerbee; citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication M19, roll 18.

[3] Abstracted by Lorraine H. Robinson, “1840 Federal Census Houston County, Georgia (file 2 of 5),” database, US Gen Web (http://files.usgwarchives.net/ga/houston/census/1840/pg373.txt    : downloaded & printed 29 August 2016), page 10 sheet no. 376, line 20, John Ellerbee; citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication M704, reel 43.

[4]  “Georgia, Marriage Records from Select Counties, 1828-1978,” marriage record, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com   : downloaded & printed 5 January 2018), entry for John Ellibee & Martha Love; citing County Marriage Records, 1828–1978; The Georgia Archives, Morrow, Georgia.

[5] 1860 U.S. Census, Calhoun county, Georgia, population schedule, District 3, p. 42 (ink pen), dwelling 289, family 289, John E Ellerbee; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed & downloaded 3 May 2019); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication M654_113.

[6]  “Maps of Georgia,” Map of US (https://www.mapofus.org/georgia/  : accessed 15 August 2019).

[7] 1870 U.S. Census, Jackson county, Florida, population schedule, Marianna, p. 54 (ink pen), dwelling 586, family 587, John Ellerbee age 63; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com  : viewed, downloaded, printed 3 May 2019); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication M593_130.

[8] “Groom Index to Jackson County, Florida,” database, US Gen Web Archives (http://files.usgwarchives.net/fl/jackson/vitals/marriages/184800g3.txt  : accessed, printed 25 August 2019), entry for Ellaby, Sanderlin and Jane Grantham, 3 Dec 1866; citing “Florida Marriages, 1848-1900, DU-HA”; Book B, Page 208.

[9] 1870 U.S. Census, Miller County, Georgia, population schedule, , p. 15 (penned), family #120, John J. Eleby, age 31; digital images, Ancestry  (http://www.ancestry.com accessed, viewed, downloaded 8 March 2017); National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.

[10] “Florida, County Marriage Records, 1823-1982,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com  : accessed 6 January 2018), entry for George Dudley & Candis Ellerbee, 14 January 1872; citing Marriage Records. Florida Marriages. Various Florida County Courthouses and State Archive, Tallahassee, Florida.

[11] “Florida Marriages, 1837-1974,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:1JY  : 10 February 2018), Richard F. Edenfield and Mattie Ellerbee, 27 Jun 1872; citing Jackson, Florida; FHL microfilm 0931955 V. D-E.

[12] 1880 U.S. Census, Hillsborough county, Florida, population schedule, Precinct 5, enumeration district (ED) 061, p. 33 (ink pen); p. 407C (stamp), dwelling 402, John Ellerbee age 72; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed, printed, downloaded 1 May 2019); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication T9, roll 128.

[13] “Florida, County Marriages, 1823-1982,” digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com  : viewed & downloaded 3 January 2018), entry for Jasper Ellerbee and Jane Hanna, 17 December 1874; citing various Florida County Courthouses and State Archive, Tallahassee, Florida.

[14] Probate record for John Ellerbee. “Florida, County Judge’s Court (Hillsborough County),” digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed & printed 5 May 2019), entry for John Ellerbee; citing “Florida, Willas and Probate Records, 1810-1914” [database online], Florida County, District and Probate Courts; administrator: W.M. Ellerbee.

[15] 1885 Florida State Census, Hillsborough county, population schedule, , page 4 D (ink pen); page 105D, family 35, J L Carter age 37 head; M. Ellerbee, 68, boarder; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed, printed, downloaded 1 May 2019); citing Schedules of the Florida State Census of 1885, National Archives microfilm publication M845, roll 4.

[16] ).  “Georgia county creation and parent counties,” Family Search Wiki (https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Georgia_County_Creation_Dates_and_Parent_Counties :  accessed 25 August 2019).

[17] Ronald William Ellerbe, The Ellerbe Family History (Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, Inc., 1986), p. 14-41.

© Susan Posten Ellerbee and Posting Family Roots, 2019.


John E. Ellerbee, his wives and the 1850 census

The 1850 census listed each person in the household. However, relationships between persons were not specified.  In general, we believe that older persons were parents or grandparents of younger persons with the same surname. Persons with a different surname might be relatives, boarders or hired help. In this post, I walk through analysis of an 1850 census record from my husband’s family history- the record for John and Martha Ellerbee.  

To confirm information often requires using multiple sources. The Ellerbe family history book presented an outline of our branch. Ronald Ellerbe listed census records from 1830 through 1880 for John Ellerbee[1]. He listed two wives, no last names, for John E. Ellerbee:  1st Martha ___________ and 2nd Elizabeth ________. I located the census records and copied details.   

The 1850 census shows John Ellerbee and family living in Baker county Georgia.[2] The transcription reads:

John Ellerbee, age 42, M W, farmer, value of real estate $2500, place of birth: Burk Co, Ga.
Martha Ellerbee, age 25, F W, birthplace: NC. Person over 20 who cannot read or write.
Edward Ellerbee, age 19, M W, farmer, birthplace: Houston Co, Ga.
Elizabeth Ellerbee, age 14, F W, birthplace: Houston co, Ga. Attended school.
James Ellerbee, age 12, M W, birthplace: Houston co, Ga. 
Sanderlin Ellerbee, age 6, M W, birthplace: Randolph co, Ga. 
Smith Ellerbee, age 5, M W, birthplace: Randolph co, Ga. 
Jasper Ellerbee, age 4, M W, birthplace: Baker co, Ga.
Not named, age 3, F W, birthplace: Baker co, Ga.
Martha Ellerbee, age 2, F W, birthplace: Baker co, Ga.
James Parker, age 15, M W, born Washington co, Ga.

Analysis and initial review:  

  • John Ellerbee, age 42, presumed head of household, farmer born in Burke county, Georgia.  During the early 1800s, people often remained near their birthplace.  
  • Martha Ellerbee, age 25. Born in North Carolina. Martha could be John’s daughter, born when he was 17 years old. John was born in Georgia and still lives in Georgia. Did he leave home, move to North Carolina as a teenager, marry, then return to his home state of Georgia? Seems unlikely. Following this line of reasoning, Martha is probably John’s wife.
  • Edward Ellerbee, age 19, farmer.  Born in Houston county, Georgia. If Martha is John’s daughter, then Edward could be her brother although their birthplaces suggest that this is probably not true.  If Martha is John’s wife, then Edward is not her son. Edward could be John’s nephew or cousin. Birthplace of Houston county, Georgia does not answer question of Edward’s relationship to John.
  • Elizabeth Ellerbee, age 14. Born in Houston county, Georgia, same birthplace as Edward which increases chance that she is Edward’s sister. If Martha is John’s wife, then Elizabeth is not her daughter.  
  • James Ellerbee, age 12. Born in Houston county, Georgia, same birthplace as Edward and Elizabeth. These three were probably siblings. If Martha is John’s wife, then James could be her son.
  • Presumed children of John E. Ellerbee and Martha:
    • Sanderlin Ellerbee, age 6 (born about 1844)
    • Smith Ellerbee, age 5 (born about 1845)
    • Jasper Ellerbee, age 4 (born about 1846)
    • Child not named, age 3 (born about 1847)
    • Martha Ellerbee, age 2 (born about 1848)
    • Ages of these five younger children suggest birth intervals of 12 months to 2 years which is consistent with child spacing during this time period.
  • James Parker, age 15. Born about 1835 in Washington county, Georgia. Possibly not related.

ASSERTION: Martha is John’s wife.  Confirmed by discovery of 1842 marriage record for John Elibee and Martha Love in Randolph county, Georgia [3]. The five younger children in 1850 census, born 1844 to 1848, are certainly John and Martha’s children.  

ASSERTION:  Edward, Elizabeth and James are children of John and his first wife. Edward died in 1863[4]. James died in 1877[5].  I have found no other records for Elizabeth.  Although listing only the head of household, earlier census records still hold clues.  

  • 1840 census for John Ellerbee in Houston county, Georgia. Search criteria were 1 male, age 30-40, 1 male age 5-10, 1 male age under 5, and 1 female under 5.  [6] 
    • Transcription:  Free white males. age 0-5: 1; age 5-10: 1; age 10-15: 1; male, age 30-40: 1.  Free white females: age 0-5: 1; age 20-30: 1.  Free colored persons: 0. Slaves: Males, age 0-10: 1. Females, age 24-35: 1 
    • Analysis: Suggests another son born between 1825 and 1830. Suggests wife born between 1810 and 1820. Probably born closer to 1810 if oldest son born as early as 1825. Supports assertion that Edward, Elizabeth and James are siblings and children of John Ellerbee’s presumed 1st wife. John owned 2 slaves. 
  • 1830 census for John Ellerbee in Houston county, Georgia. [7]  Name: John Ellerbee, Home in 1830: Houston, Georgia. 
    • Transcription: 
      Free white persons, Males- 20-29: 1 [born 1801-1810; John as head of household]
      Free white persons, females- 15 thru 19: 1 [born 1811-1815; presumed wife]
      Total- All persons (free white, slaves, free colored): 2.  
    • Analysis: Suggests no children born yet to the young couple. From 1840 census, son aged 10-15 years was probably born in late 1830. John owned 2 slaves.  

Based on evidence, I conclude that Martha is John’s 2nd wife. The 1842 marriage record confirmed their relationship.[8]  John’s 1st wife was probably born between 1811 and 1815 and died between 1840 and 1842. She and John had four children, three of whom lived with their father and stepmother in 1850.  For me, the name of John Ellerbee’s first wife remains unknown although the author of the Ellerbe history called her ‘Elizabeth’. Did he guess based on her presumed daughter, Elizabeth? Did he have a specific source for the information? My discovery of the 1842 marriage record for John and Martha expands information in the Ellerbe history.  

REFLECTION

I again compared information from a published source with census and other records found online. My research supports Ronald Ellerbe’s work. Writing puts my thoughts into a semi-coherent format. I try to follow Genealogy Standards as I write but I still need lots of practice!

What I learned:  I still miss information found in census records.

What helped:  Previous review and transcription of records. Asking specific question before searching records.

What didn’t help: Files still in disarray. Laptop death about 2 weeks ago. Fortunately, I have a notebook computer and I back up everything (well, almost everything!) on a regular basis. Last backup was about 2 weeks before laptop demise. Maybe I should write a post about that experience?!?

To-do:  Complete research logs for each of John’s children. Follow presumed children through census and other records. If possible, locate death certificates.  Search 1810 census for Ellerbee families in Burke county, Georgia. Search 1820 census beginning in Burke county then expand to nearby Georgia counties as needed. Use county formation data to locate family.

© Susan Posten Ellerbee and Posting Family Roots blog, 2019

SOURCES:

[1] Ronald William Ellerbe, The Ellerbe Family History (Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, Inc., 1986)

[2] 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Baker County, Georgia, population schedule, District 3, p. 49 B (ink pen), dwelling 1111, family 141, John E. Ellerbee; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com  : accessed, printed, downloaded 3 January 2018); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. Roll M432_61.

[3] “Georgia, Marriage Records from Select Counties, 1828-1978,” marriage record, Ancestry ( http://www.ancestry.com   :  downloaded & printed 5 January 2018), entry for John Ellibee & Martha Love; citing  County Marriage Records, 1828–1978; The Georgia Archives, Morrow, Georgia.

[4] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com   : viewed 22 May 2019), memorial page for Edward Alexander Ellerbee, Find A Grave Memorial # 44681078, citing Ellerbee Family Cemetery (Five Points, Randolph county, Georgia), memorial created by Gerry Hill.

[5] Family data, Demarious Albina Ellerbee Family Bible, Holy Bible, (New York: American Bible Society, 1876); original owned in October 2016 by Darby Blanton, [address for private use], Darby is descendent of Demarious Ellerbee & Thomas Blanton. “J.J. Ellerbee departed this life December the 17th 1877 age 38 years 11 months and 17 days.”

[6] 1840 Census for John Ellerbee, Houston county, Georgia. Abstracted by Lorraine H. Robinson, “1840 Federal Census Houston County, Georgia (file 2 of 5),” database, US Gen Web (http://files.usgwarchives.net/ga/houston/census/1840/pg373.txt   : downloaded & printed 29 August 2011), page 10, sheet no. 376, line 21, John Ellerbee; citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microflim publication M704, reel 43.

[7] 1830 census for John Ellerbee, Houston county, Georgia.  1830 U.S. Census, Houston County, Georgia, population schedule, , page 291, John E Ellerbee; digital images, US Gen Web  (http://files.usgwarchives.net/ga/houston/census/1830/pg1.txt   : viewed, downloaded, printed 6 February 2016); citing National Archives & Records Administration, Washington, D.C. microfilm publication M19, roll 18.

[8] 1842 marriage record for John Ellibee and Martha Love (2nd note). “Georgia, Marriage Records from Select Counties, 1828-1978,” marriage record, Ancestry,  entry for John Ellibee & Martha Love.